JUSTICE MATTERS

The Foreigner's Home

RIAN BROWN-ORSO, GEOFF PINGREE
USA, 2017
56 minutes, Color
Official website

In Person: Producer Ford Morrison and directors Rian Brown-Orso and/or Geoff Pingree
- April 26 Moderator: Jocelyn Imani, Cultural Historian
- April 28 Moderator: Greg Carr, Assoc. Prof Africana Studies and Chair of Dept. of Afro-American Studies, Howard University

Toni Morrison has much to say about shipwreck Earth, and her words resonate throughout an exhibition she guest-curated at the Louvre in 2006. Morrison invited renowned artists to join her in a public conversation about "foreignness" that she had been pursuing for years. The black victims of Hurricane Katrina are equated to Arab and African refugees in the Mediterranean as a failure of society. The film keeps coming back to the iconic 1818 painting at the Louvre, The Raft of the Medusa by Théodore Géricault, which shows people of many races adrift, desperately hoping to be saved. Morrison brings in disparate sources from her own background (the working-class factory town of Lorain, Ohio, with "immigrants everywhere who shared everything") to say that art is for healing. The words are straightforward, but the haunting music, animated scenes, and the logic of poetry reach unquestionable peaks of deep emotion.—Miguel Pendás

In English and French with English subtitles

JUSTICE MATTERS

The Foreigner's Home

RIAN BROWN-ORSO, GEOFF PINGREE
USA, 2017
56 minutes, Color
Official website

In Person: Producer Ford Morrison and directors Rian Brown-Orso and/or Geoff Pingree
- April 26 Moderator: Jocelyn Imani, Cultural Historian
- April 28 Moderator: Greg Carr, Assoc. Prof Africana Studies and Chair of Dept. of Afro-American Studies, Howard University

Toni Morrison has much to say about shipwreck Earth, and her words resonate throughout an exhibition she guest-curated at the Louvre in 2006. Morrison invited renowned artists to join her in a public conversation about "foreignness" that she had been pursuing for years. The black victims of Hurricane Katrina are equated to Arab and African refugees in the Mediterranean as a failure of society. The film keeps coming back to the iconic 1818 painting at the Louvre, The Raft of the Medusa by Théodore Géricault, which shows people of many races adrift, desperately hoping to be saved. Morrison brings in disparate sources from her own background (the working-class factory town of Lorain, Ohio, with "immigrants everywhere who shared everything") to say that art is for healing. The words are straightforward, but the haunting music, animated scenes, and the logic of poetry reach unquestionable peaks of deep emotion.—Miguel Pendás

In English and French with English subtitles


Thursday, April 26
6:00 PM
$14.00
Saturday, April 28
7:00 PM
$14.00

Trailers may not have subtitles but all of our foreign language films do.
Having trouble viewing the trailer? See it here.